Key West Radio Show

Black and Skabuddah

Laura Black and Russ Scavelli are among the top entertainers in Key West.

They have preformed almost every venue on the Island. I first meet them playing at Capt Tony's Saloon. Great people and great singers.  

Sloppy Joe's

Sloppy Joe's

 

Founded on December 5, 1933, the bar's most famous patrons were Ernest Hemingway and the infamous rum runner Habana Joe. The original location at the time Hemingway frequented Sloppy Joe's is a few doors down to the west, just off Duval Street, at 428 Greene Street, and is now called "Captain Tony's Saloon".

The bar went through two name changes before settling on Sloppy Joe's with the encouragement of Hemingway. The name was coined from the original Sloppy Joe's bar in Old Havana, that sold both liquor and iced seafood. In the Cuban heat, the ice melted and patrons taunted the owner José (Joe) García Río that he ran a "sloppy" place.

The bar is the site of the Ernest Hemingway look-alike contest, started in 1981. It is well known as a tourist attraction, with live bands and slushy drinks. On November 1, 2006, it was added to the National Register of Historic Places.

Toko Irie

Toko Irie

 Toko Irie, originally from Grenada, has been jamming island music in Key West for the past 15 years. He is best known for playing the steel drums with an artistic sense of speed combined with a unique 3-stick method of playing. Introduced to the pan at the age of 9, Toko Irie honed his skills on an old steel drum given to him by a pan maker who lived in his village. At age 14, he formed a group with his brother and his cousin and they had the opportunity to compete annually against the island’s best in the Carnival competitions. An age 19, he became the musical director for a 40piece steel pan group who performed around the island as well as on cruise ships. 

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